Our thoughts are with those affected by the tragedy of Hurricanes Harvey and Irma. The Red Cross is providing multiple avenues to aid the thousands affected by the storm.

Click here to learn how you can contribute to help the victims.

Medications During Pregnancy

General Guidelines:

  • Follow the directions on the package as there is no need to adjust dosing during pregnancy for the medications on the list.
  • If your symptoms do not improve with these medications or if you are planning to take a medication that is not on the list, call us FIRST.
  • Generic equivalents are safe.
  • Call your Pediatrician for any questions related to breastfeeding.

Safe Medications During Pregnancy

Symptom                                   Medication
Nausea, Vomiting                          Emetrol, Benadryl, Dramamine, Less Drowsy Dramamine, real Ginger Ale, Sea Bands

Gas, Indigestion, Heartburn           Mylanta, Maalox, Pepcid AC, Prilosec OTC, Tums, Rolaids, Zantac or any
                                                  other-the-counter indigestion medicines

Sinus, Colds                                 All cough and throat lozenges and sprays,
                                                  Robitussin DM, vapor rub, pseudoephedrine

Headache                                     Regular or Extra Strength Tylenol, Tylenol-PM

Diarrhea                                      Immodium AD after 24 hours of symptoms

Constipation                                 Metamucil, Citrucel, Benafiber, Colace, Miralax

Fever Blisters                              Campophenique, Blistex

Seasonal Allergies/Rhinitis:            Benadryl, Claritin, Zyrtec, Flonase, Nasonex, Mucinex

 

Medications to AVOID During Pregnancy:


Asprin: Excedrin, Bufferin, Goodys, BC Powder
Ibuprofen: Advil, Nuprin, Midol, Motrin
Naproxen: Aleve, Naprosyn
Ketoprofen: Orudis, Actron
Decongestants: Sudaphed PE

Check with your Doctor before using:
Nasal Sprays
Milk of Magnesia

 

Activities Recommendations:
Your physician may need to modify these recommendations based on your specific health considerations. Before any activity, notify the professional in charge that you are pregnant. Tobacco smoke and alcoholic beverages should be avoided. Pregnant women should also avoid secondhand smoke. The safety of e-cigarettes is undetermined, and many of these products contain flavorings, phthalates, and other potentially harmful chemicals. Caffeine consumption should be limited to the equivalent of 8oz of coffee per day.

Amusement Park Rides
Follow park recommendations

Bathing
Tubs baths and showers are allowed

Cats
Avoid handing cat litter. If absolutely necessary use gloves and a mask

Dentist
Good dental hygiene is associated with better pregnancy outcomes. Local anesthetics (numbing injections or gels) and shielded x-rays are permissible if necessary.

Exercise

Exercise is good for you and your baby. Avoid overly strenuous activity by following these common-sense guidelines:

  • If it hurts, don't do it.
  • Stay aerobic (able to speak in full sentences). If you are huffing and puffing, slow down.
  • Avoid activity that requires balance and risks injury (cycling, skiing, roller blading, etc).

Exterminators
Avoid areas with strong odors

Fumes

Avoid any fumes/odors that cause nausea, headaches, or dizziness

Hair Treatments
Avoid perms and hair color. Highlights and lowlights are allowed with proper ventilation

Horseback Riding, Skiing, and Roller Blading
Avoid these and other sports that risk trauma to your abdomen

Hot Tubs
Allowed after the first 12 weeks of Pregnancy. The temperature should not exceed 100 degrees F

Nails
Manicures and pedicures and allowed. Acrylic nails are allowed with proper ventilation

Painting
Allowed with proper ventilation. Avoid lead and oil-based paints

Swimming
Allowed

Tanning
Avoid tanning beds! Adequate sunscreen should always be used for outdoor activities. Tanning lotions are allowed.


Useful Links for Environmental Exposure Concerns 

The Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Unites (PEHSUs) works with health care professionals, parents, schools, and community groups to provide information about protecting children from environmental hazards.

http://www.pehsu.net/general_public.html

 

Below is the link to the University of California, San Francisco's Program on Reproductive Health and the Environment.

http://prhe.ucsf.edu/prhe/families.html

Environmental Working Group (EWG) publishes annual lists of "dirty dozen" (foods likely to be high in pesticide residue) and "clean 15" (foods likely to be low in pesticide residue).

http://www.ewg.org/foodnews/

Other important resources include:

www.cdc.gov/Zika

www.cdc.gov/CMV/index.html